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JayTee

ELI5: What's the difference between a M.2 2280 1TB PCI-Express 3.0 x4 3D NAND vs P1 3D NAND NVMe PCIe M.2 SSD 1TB

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JayTee

Apparently NVMe is better but what does it do? What is it? I googled it but still can't understand.... Does it just make it faster or? Why is it better? Please ELI5, thankyou!

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Carnage

Have you seen this? I forgot they did one for nvme.

 

 

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SoranoGuardias

NVMe is the communication protocol used between the NAND storage and the system. The AHCI protocol typically used by the SATA interface drives, both M.2 B-key and conventional SATA form factor SSDs and hard drive, was designed to optimally transfer data from spinning magnetic media.

NVMe is "Non-Volatile Memory Express" and is now synonymous with performance solid-state storage. The NVMe protocol allows the system more pipelines with which to transceive data on the storage device over a wider interface size (6Gbit SATA vs 8Gbit per PCIe lane) and is usable across many form factors, including M.2 B, M, B+M, PCIe add-in card, and the SAS-based SFF-8643 - also called U.2.

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JayTee
Posted (edited)
18 minutes ago, SoranoGuardias said:

NVMe is the communication protocol used between the NAND storage and the system. The AHCI protocol typically used by the SATA interface drives, both M.2 B-key and conventional SATA form factor SSDs and hard drive, was designed to optimally transfer data from spinning magnetic media.

NVMe is "Non-Volatile Memory Express" and is now synonymous with performance solid-state storage. The NVMe protocol allows the system more pipelines with which to transceive data on the storage device over a wider interface size (6Gbit SATA vs 8Gbit per PCIe lane) and is usable across many form factors, including M.2 B, M, B+M, PCIe add-in card, and the SAS-based SFF-8643 - also called U.2.

 

So in an ELI5 and TLDR, its faster then a normal SSD... right? If so how much % faster?

 

Edit: Watched Carnages video, pretty informative :) 

Edited by JayTee

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SoranoGuardias

It depends on the use-case and what you are willing to pay. SATA is usually fast enough for most systems and cheaper, as well as universally compatible to boot from. Most systems made within the last 5 years support NVMe booting, so there will be no problem there.

When it comes to NVMe-based SSDs you will notice faster file transfers, but you will notice a much faster response to your operating system and your applications due to the better queue management and more access pipelines for the numerous small files. Think of it like this: your SSD is a library. Instead of one librarian to help each request for data, you have 600. How fast do you think people would be able to find the books they want?

In terms of raw speed you are looking at a possible maximum of 4 Gigabytes-per-second upper limit for read speeds compared to 550 Megabytes for performance SATA SSDs

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