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Looking to upgrade my PC/need advice


Alberny
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Time has come, I am done with school and got enough money saved up for an upgrade :D

 

Currently have:
Case: Define R4 Black Pearl
AMD FX-6350 6 Core CPU 3,9 GHz
Asus GTX760
2x DDR3-RAM 4 GB, 1600 Mhz
Corsair CX500 V2

 

friend suggested to get the following stuff:
AMD Ryzen 5 1600
MSI B350 Gaming Plus
Crucial Ballistix Tactical 16GB 
GTX 1070 (maybe 1060, not sure about this yet/what version to get?)
CPU Cooler: Thermalright HR-02 Macho
Power supply should still be fine he said, otherwise I should get this: Corsair TX-M


Looking to keep the case as well

Oh and I need new harddrives, recommendations are appreciated

Oh and also a second screen, currently have a HP Compaq LA2306x, a screen of ~the same size would be optimal, the new screen will be the primary screen (144hz and all that fancy shit)

 

So, uh is this a good build? I have little to no idea about pc building, the friend who recommended the parts also offered me to put them together so there's that.

What could/should I swap out and for what? 

 

Thanks in advance.

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3 minutes ago, mastikhor said:

i would swap rx 580 instead of nvidia and go for 40+ inch tv instead of 144hz monitor 

http://imgur.com/Q6sl67w

^ my setup 23' Dell monitor + 43' Sanyo TV

 

 

RX 470/480/570/580 are more in line of GTX 970 performance (with some additional VRAM and other goodies) - GTX 1070 is in different league of performance (around 50% boost depending on game) if he has money he should go for it.

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 - For the CPU, I'd personally recommend going with the 1500X, as the 1600 doesn't really have a compelling enough performance upgrade to warrant the price (though if you can find it on sale for a similar price go right ahead).

 - Motherboard is solid, not much to say about it.
 - RAM is fine, generally as long as it's from a well-known company (like Kingston, Corsair, Crucial, etc) you should be good.

 - As for the GPU, it's really up to what you can afford and what kind of stuff you're doing with it. You mentioned you'd like to get a 144hz monitor, which is why I'd say the 1070 would suit you best, as the 1060 is better for 1080p60 than higher resolutions or refresh rates. AMD's current offerings aren't really comparable right now, which is a bit disappointing because I'm getting sick of Nvidia's shit, though their GPUs are much more powerful.

 - For SSD, I really can't recommend the Samsung models enough. My two 120gb 840s have been going strong for many years with probably a lot more than the average read/write cycles to them too. While I haven't personally tested any M.2 SSDs, I've heard that Samsung's are the way to go as well, though keep in mind the price per GB isn't really amazing yet, so I'd still suggest a SATA SSD for the time being. Kingston's cheaper models are also good on a budget (though life expectancy is lower), just stay completely clear of OCZ, they are not worth your money IMO.

 - For mass storage, I've never had trouble with Seagate's drives, and their surveillance models offer more reliability while maintaining speeds for only a couple dollars more than the standard ones. 

 - PSU is fine, you have more than enough wattage, and every year new parts get more efficient anyway so I expect the need for anything over 600-700W to dwindle in a few years' time.

 - CPU cooler seems to have some clearance issues due to its size, but aside from that is a pretty good air cooler. Keep in mind though that only the more recently manufactured units will have the AM4 mounting hardware included in the box, otherwise you will have to contact Thermalright so they can send it to you (AFAIK this doesn't cost you anything, but I may be wrong here)

 

I haven't really been keeping up with monitors recently, but I definitely wouldn't recommend a TV as a substitute, because if you're wanting high refresh rate gaming I doubt you would be satisfied with the poor response time of TVs, even with game mode enabled. Though, they can be a great way to experience singleplayer games that don't rely on quick reflexes and precision timing, as well as watch movies/YouTube/Netflix. Try to stick with tried and true brands like LG/Acer/Asus and you'll generally get a good monitor.

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16 minutes ago, Wingwire said:

 - For the CPU, I'd personally recommend going with the 1500X, as the 1600 doesn't really have a compelling enough performance upgrade to warrant the price (though if you can find it on sale for a similar price go right ahead).

 - Motherboard is solid, not much to say about it.
 - RAM is fine, generally as long as it's from a well-known company (like Kingston, Corsair, Crucial, etc) you should be good.

 - As for the GPU, it's really up to what you can afford and what kind of stuff you're doing with it. You mentioned you'd like to get a 144hz monitor, which is why I'd say the 1070 would suit you best, as the 1060 is better for 1080p60 than higher resolutions or refresh rates. AMD's current offerings aren't really comparable right now, which is a bit disappointing because I'm getting sick of Nvidia's shit, though their GPUs are much more powerful.

 - For SSD, I really can't recommend the Samsung models enough. My two 120gb 840s have been going strong for many years with probably a lot more than the average read/write cycles to them too. While I haven't personally tested any M.2 SSDs, I've heard that Samsung's are the way to go as well, though keep in mind the price per GB isn't really amazing yet, so I'd still suggest a SATA SSD for the time being. Kingston's cheaper models are also good on a budget (though life expectancy is lower), just stay completely clear of OCZ, they are not worth your money IMO.

 - For mass storage, I've never had trouble with Seagate's drives, and their surveillance models offer more reliability while maintaining speeds for only a couple dollars more than the standard ones. 

 - PSU is fine, you have more than enough wattage, and every year new parts get more efficient anyway so I expect the need for anything over 600-700W to dwindle in a few years' time.

 - CPU cooler seems to have some clearance issues due to its size, but aside from that is a pretty good air cooler. Keep in mind though that only the more recently manufactured units will have the AM4 mounting hardware included in the box, otherwise you will have to contact Thermalright so they can send it to you (AFAIK this doesn't cost you anything, but I may be wrong here)

 

I haven't really been keeping up with monitors recently, but I definitely wouldn't recommend a TV as a substitute, because if you're wanting high refresh rate gaming I doubt you would be satisfied with the poor response time of TVs, even with game mode enabled. Though, they can be a great way to experience singleplayer games that don't rely on quick reflexes and precision timing, as well as watch movies/YouTube/Netflix. Try to stick with tried and true brands like LG/Acer/Asus and you'll generally get a good monitor.

6-core is probably better way to go in 2017, AMD HT is not on same level as Intel implementation (this is normal since this is first AMDs implementation) and from what i have seen in benchmarks that most games even works better when you disable it - so it is better to go with 6 physical cores. In most cases people are buying PCs to last them 3+ years (for me its 2-3 GPUs per one CPU MoBo combo) so better pay a bit more for 6 cores.

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1 hour ago, Wingwire said:

 - For the CPU, I'd personally recommend going with the 1500X, as the 1600 doesn't really have a compelling enough performance upgrade to warrant the price (though if you can find it on sale for a similar price go right ahead).

A 1600 is just $20 more. It's well worth the money for 50% more cores in case OP wants to do any multitasking/streaming, or even the potential future gaming performance. 

 

1 hour ago, Wingwire said:

 - As for the GPU, it's really up to what you can afford and what kind of stuff you're doing with it. You mentioned you'd like to get a 144hz monitor, which is why I'd say the 1070 would suit you best, as the 1060 is better for 1080p60 than higher resolutions or refresh rates. AMD's current offerings aren't really comparable right now, which is a bit disappointing because I'm getting sick of Nvidia's shit, though their GPUs are much more powerful.

The 580 competes with the 1060, and Vega will be launching very soon (finally) and should be competitive with the 1070/1080

 

1 hour ago, Wingwire said:

 

 - For SSD, I really can't recommend the Samsung models enough. My two 120gb 840s have been going strong for many years with probably a lot more than the average read/write cycles to them too. While I haven't personally tested any M.2 SSDs, I've heard that Samsung's are the way to go as well, though keep in mind the price per GB isn't really amazing yet, so I'd still suggest a SATA SSD for the time being. Kingston's cheaper models are also good on a budget (though life expectancy is lower), just stay completely clear of OCZ, they are not worth your money IMO.

OCZ drives are fine budget drives nowadays that they are owned by Toshiba. It was before the acquisition that they made crap. The thing with SSDs is that they feel fast because of the low latency more than anything else -- so for most people there isn't any advantage to an M.2 SSD over a SATA SSD -- or even a higher end SATA SSD vs. a budget SSD. And these days basically all SSDs will last a few hundred terabytes of writes -- significantly more than the vast majority of people would ever put on them. So durability isn't much of a reason these days either. So, as far as I'm concerned, there isn't much of a compelling reason to go with a high end SSD compared to the cheaper options like an Adata SU800/SP600/SP550, PNY CS1311, Sandisk SSD Plus/Ultra 2/X400, Kingston HyperX Fury, OCZ Trion.

 

1 hour ago, Wingwire said:

- For mass storage, I've never had trouble with Seagate's drives, and their surveillance models offer more reliability while maintaining speeds for only a couple dollars more than the standard ones. 

Hitachi and HGST also make excellent drives. Most HDDs are solid these days. 

 

1 hour ago, Wingwire said:

 - PSU is fine, you have more than enough wattage, and every year new parts get more efficient anyway so I expect the need for anything over 600-700W to dwindle in a few years' time.

There's far more to a psu that just wattage. 

 

 

@Alberny

CPU/GPU is fine. I'd check out a Cryorig H7 for the CPU cooler. For RAM anything is good -- just get whatever's cheapest/looks best. Basically the same applies to motherboards as well -- just get a B350/X370 board that looks good and has decent VRM heatsinks/power delivery and that has an 8-pin cpu power connector. For storage,, Adata's SU800 and Hitachi's Ultrastar 1tb are currently the cheapest, and are both good options. Your PSU is good enough, it's not particularly good and I wouldn't buy it today, but it's decent enough that you don't NEED to replace it. 

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Guys have none of you noticed that since like probably a month ago the crypto miners bought all the midrange cards

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2 hours ago, Twins_Mercury said:

Guys have none of you noticed that since like probably a month ago the crypto miners bought all the midrange cards

The mining craze ended about a week ago. So they will slowly start to come back in stock and at reasonable prices. 

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11 hours ago, AwesomeMcCoolName said:

A 1600 is just $20 more. It's well worth the money for 50% more cores in case OP wants to do any multitasking/streaming, or even the potential future gaming performance. 

Huh, that's a lot better than where I live, for me it's more like $50-60 higher at best. If the price difference is that low, go for it, definitely

 

11 hours ago, AwesomeMcCoolName said:

The 580 competes with the 1060, and Vega will be launching very soon (finally) and should be competitive with the 1070/1080

1060 isn't really the best for this build in the first place (considering they want high refresh rate gaming), but I do still hold hope for Vega

 

11 hours ago, AwesomeMcCoolName said:

OCZ drives are fine budget drives nowadays that they are owned by Toshiba. It was before the acquisition that they made crap. The thing with SSDs is that they feel fast because of the low latency more than anything else -- so for most people there isn't any advantage to an M.2 SSD over a SATA SSD -- or even a higher end SATA SSD vs. a budget SSD. And these days basically all SSDs will last a few hundred terabytes of writes -- significantly more than the vast majority of people would ever put on them. So durability isn't much of a reason these days either. So, as far as I'm concerned, there isn't much of a compelling reason to go with a high end SSD compared to the cheaper options like an Adata SU800/SP600/SP550, PNY CS1311, Sandisk SSD Plus/Ultra 2/X400, Kingston HyperX Fury, OCZ Trion.

Samsung produces more mainstream-priced SSDs too, like the slightly older but still incredibly reliable 850, and I like them because they've been benchmarked to handle over a petabyte of read/write cycles with very little degredation in speed. Cheaper SSDs are still fine and fast nowadays, but personally I'd rather put a little extra towards ones that are known to live longer, and stay faster for longer

 

11 hours ago, AwesomeMcCoolName said:

There's far more to a psu that just wattage. 

Yes, but their current model is still solid, from a reputable company, and it has an 80+ rating, which even for the lower ratings means it's been stress tested and certified, so it's not really worth replacing at this point in time

 

@Alberny 

While most hard drives are fine, WD Blues seem to die on me way too often, so it isn't something I'd really recommend. Try to get something from Seagate, or like AwesomeMcCoolName said, Hitachi or HGST. All pretty solid options. And I hope an SSD not being on that PCPP list isn't final, they really do make an incredible difference IMO, because aside from your OS, they're great for having a large and fast page file, running the Adobe suite on, etc. Though if it's because of cost, that's understandable, but do consider it for the future. 

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22 minutes ago, Wingwire said:

Samsung produces more mainstream-priced SSDs too, like the slightly older but still incredibly reliable 850, and I like them because they've been benchmarked to handle over a petabyte of read/write cycles with very little degredation in speed. Cheaper SSDs are still fine and fast nowadays, but personally I'd rather put a little extra towards ones that are known to live longer, and stay faster for longer

 

Yes, but their current model is still solid, from a reputable company, and it has an 80+ rating, which even for the lower ratings means it's been stress tested and certified, so it's not really worth replacing at this point in time

The 850 is still quite a bit more expensive than the cheaper Adata/Sandisk/Crucial/OCZ/PNY traditional TLC-based drives. You're looking at $50~ for a budget 120gb SSD vs. $90 for an 850 Evo. The difference between the two just isn't big enough to justify the price difference for the average user considering the average user will never notice a difference. Even those budget SSDs are going to long outlive their useful life. You're talking hundreds of terabytes of writes, which is something that the vast majority of people wouldn't put on the SSD before 120gb is literally nothing. 

 

The CX (green) series is actually pretty mediocre and isn't designed for use in high end systems -- the caps are only rated for 30ºc and are designed to be used in an office-like pc. Efficiency has nothing to do with quality. 

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On 7/22/2017 at 11:16 PM, Alberny said:

Time has come, I am done with school and got enough money saved up for an upgrade :D

 

Currently have:
Case: Define R4 Black Pearl
AMD FX-6350 6 Core CPU 3,9 GHz
Asus GTX760
2x DDR3-RAM 4 GB, 1600 Mhz
Corsair CX500 V2

 

friend suggested to get the following stuff:
AMD Ryzen 5 1600
MSI B350 Gaming Plus
Crucial Ballistix Tactical 16GB 
GTX 1070 (maybe 1060, not sure about this yet/what version to get?)
CPU Cooler: Thermalright HR-02 Macho
Power supply should still be fine he said, otherwise I should get this: Corsair TX-M


Looking to keep the case as well

Oh and I need new harddrives, recommendations are appreciated

Oh and also a second screen, currently have a HP Compaq LA2306x, a screen of ~the same size would be optimal, the new screen will be the primary screen (144hz and all that fancy shit)

 

So, uh is this a good build? I have little to no idea about pc building, the friend who recommended the parts also offered me to put them together so there's that.

What could/should I swap out and for what? 

 

Thanks in advance.

and im here with a $400 laptop playing tf2 at 45 fps haha

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11 minutes ago, animallover said:

and im here with a $400 laptop playing tf2 at 45 fps haha

rip, ordered the stuff yesterday :D

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